Du har en nettleser som vi ikke støtter. Les om godkjente OS/nettleserversjoner

Hopp til hovedmeny Hopp til innholdet

Pregnancy and maternity care in Norway

All pregnant women in Norway are entitled to maternity care from a midwife at a Maternity and Child Health Care Centre (in Norwegian: “helsestasjon") or from their GP ("fastlege"). The consultations are free of charge.

Contact a midwife or your doctor when you know that you are pregnant
Foto: Johnér Bildebyrå AB

​There are usually 9 antenatal appointments including one ultrasound screening during pregnancy. The consultations are free of charge, and pregnant employees have the right to paid time off work for antenatal appointments.

Health care personnel will provide advice and support to ensure the health and wellbeing of you and your baby.

When you see your midwife or GP she/he will give both you and your baby a health check, and give you useful information to help with your health and wellbeing. You will also get answers to any questions you have. You can usually invite your partner to accompany you if you wish.

Contact a midwife or your doctor

​As soon as a reliable test has confirmed that you are pregnant, contact a midwife or your regular GP. They will give you essential information from the very start of your pregnancy. At the same time, you can consult and inform them about health matters, and should tell them if you are being treated for any chronic diseases.                   

Your lifestyle can make a difference to your own and your child's health in the short and long term. You can discuss positive behaviours affecting health, such as exercise, a balanced diet and a healthy body weight, and risky behaviours such as smoking, drinking alcohol or using other substances, or being exposed to sexual abuse or violence. It is an opportunity to talk early in pregnancy about any other subjects and to ask any questions that you may have.

Start taking folic acid supplements (the first three months or 12 weeks).

8-12 weeks pregnant: First regular appointment

The first regular appointment usually takes place when you are 8-12 weeks pregnant. At this appointment information will be recorded in your personal maternity record or hand held record ("helsekort").

During the appointment, your midwife or doctor should talk to you about: 

  • how the baby develops during the pregnancy
  • nutrition/diet (and remind you to take a cod liver supplement)
  • tobacco (smoking and snuff)
  • alcohol and other lifestyle habits
  • exercise in general and pelvic floor exercises in particular
  • antenatal screening tests
  • your antenatal care
  • maternity and paternity benefits
  • your options of where to have your baby (booking a place at hospital or midwifery unit)

Your midwife or doctor should:

  • plan the care you will get throughout your pregnancy and give you your personal maternity record/hand held record ("helsekort")
  • see if you may need additional care or support
  • identify any potential risks associated with your work
  • measure your height and weight, and calculate your body mass index (BMI)

(If you are underweight or overweight, you should get individual advice)

  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein and glucose
  • find out if you are at increased risk of pregnancy related diabetes or pre-eclampsia
  • Refer you to an ultrasound scan at 17-19 weeks to estimate
    • when your baby is due
    • the physical development of your baby
    • the position of your placenta
  • record the results of routine blood tests carried out for blood type and antibodies, blood count/haemoglobin, rubella, HIV and syphilis
  • hepatitis B and hepatitis C (if it is indicated)
  • take a screening test for chlamydia if you are under 25 years old or if you want it
  • ask about any experiences with domestic violence and abuse, including sexual abuse

You should inform your midwife or doctor:

  • if you have had any complications in a previous pregnancy or delivery
  • if you have a chronic disease (for example diabetes or high blood pressure)
  • if you or the father are carriers for any hereditary diseases which could affect your baby
  • if you have been circumcised (female genital mutilation, FGM), as it could have an impact on your labour and birth. Measures can be taken during pregnancy to prevent any problems when you give birth.

17-19 weeks pregnant - Ultrasound

​Your midwife or doctor will give you information about the ultrasound scan that will take place at 17-19 weeks. The purpose of the ultrasound is to estimate when your baby is due (date), check the number of babies (twins, triplets), and check the position of the placenta and the physical development of the baby. The ultrasound is usually performed at an outpatient clinic at the hospital where you will be having your baby.

24 weeks pregnant

​At this appointment your midwife or doctor should: 

  • review, discuss and record the results of screening tests
  • offer a Rhesus D test, if you are RhD negative
  • measure your blood pressure
  • test your urine for protein and glucose
  • record your weight
  • use a tape measure to measure the size of your uterus to check the baby's growth
  • listen to your baby's heartbeat
  • record if you have felt your baby moving yet
  • inform about antenatal classes

28 and 32 weeks pregnant

Your midwife or doctor should:

  • check your haemoglobin (blood count) at 28 weeks
  • consider an iron supplement if you're anaemic
  • measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your weight
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein and glucose
  • listen to your baby's heartbeat
  • record if you have felt your baby moving
  • talk about and write down a birth plan

If you are Rh negative and your baby is Rh positive you should receive an injection of Rh prophylaxis at 28 weeks.

If you feel that your baby is moving less or hardly at all, call the hospital's labour ward ("fødeavdeling"). You should have a check-up at the hospital as soon as possible.

36 weeks pregnant

Your midwife or doctor should: 

  • measure the size of your uterus and your weight
  • ask if you can feel the baby's movements
  • measure your blood pressure
  • test your urine for protein and glucose
  • check the position of your baby and listen to the baby's heartbeat. If your baby has its feet down (breech position) you will be referred to the hospital
  • give you information about getting ready for labour and birth, including how to recognise active labour, ways of coping with pain in labour, and your birth plan

If your waters break you should always contact the hospital. 

38 - 41 weeks pregnant

Your midwife or doctor should:

  • measure the size of your uterus and your weight
  • ask if you can feel the baby's movements
  • check the position of your baby and listen to the baby's heartbeat
  • measure your blood pressure
  • test your urine for protein and glucose

Towards the end of your pregnancy your midwife or GP should also give you information about:

  • breastfeeding
  • caring for your newborn baby
  • vitamin K and screening tests for your newborn baby
  • your own health after your baby is born
  • causes and symptoms of "baby blues" and postnatal depression

Your midwife or doctor should give you information about what happens if your pregnancy lasts longer than 41 weeks.

41 weeks pregnant

At 41 weeks you will be referred to hospital for a check-up. This should be done at about 7-9 days past your estimated due date (based on ultrasound). You will be seen by a midwife and an obstetrician, and they should:

  • measure the size of your uterus
  • measure your blood pressure and test your urine for protein and glucose
  • do a clinical assessment and ultrasound scan and discuss the options and choices for induction of labour.

You can find online information about antenatal appointments in Norwegian here